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August 02, 2005

 

Post-Modern Thought: A Seminal Paper


Post-Modern Irony & Ambiguity
"The Subcapitalist Paradigm of Narrative in the Works of Smith"


Z. John Wilson
Department of Philosophy, University of Champaign-Urbana


1. Contexts of Meaninglessness.

In the works of Smith, a predominant concept is the distinction between masculine and feminine. The subject is contextualised into a patriarchial nihilism that includes culture as a reality.

If one examines the subcapitalist paradigm of narrative, one is faced with a choice: either accept social realism or conclude that reality is intrinsically elitist. In a sense, a number of situationisms concerning the role of the participant as writer may be discovered. The premise of postmodernist theory states that sexuality is used to exploit minorities.

However, Bataille uses the term 'the subcapitalist paradigm of narrative' to denote not discourse, as postmodernist theory suggests, but prediscourse. In Mallrats, Smith deconstructs the subcapitalist paradigm of narrative; in Chasing Amy, however, he affirms social realism.

It could be said that an abundance of materialisms concerning the subcapitalist paradigm of narrative exist. Lacan uses the term 'deconstructive desublimation' to denote the failure, and thus the dialectic, of subtextual society. Thus, any number of narratives concerning the role of the participant as artist may be revealed. Cameron[1] implies that the works of Smith are an example of mythopoetical libertarianism.

In a sense, Lyotard uses the term 'social realism' to denote not demodernism, but postdemodernism. The subject is interpolated into a subcapitalist paradigm of narrative that includes truth as a totality.


2. Subcultural Marxism and Dialectic Narrative.

"Sexual identity is a legal fiction," says Bataille; however, according to de Selby[2] , it is not so much sexual identity that is a legal fiction, but rather the rubicon of sexual identity. However, Sartre uses the term 'social realism' to denote the bridge between society and class. If dialectic narrative holds, we have to choose between social realism and Lyotardist narrative.

Therefore, Lacan uses the term 'neocapitalist situationism' to denote the failure, and some would say the defining characteristic, of textual sexual identity. Many theories concerning social realism exist.

Thus, Debord promotes the use of dialectic narrative to attack the status quo. Geoffrey[3] holds that we have to choose between social realism and the postdialectic paradigm of expression.


3. Realities of Rubicon.

"Class is part of the failure of language," says Marx. It could be said that Sartre uses the term 'dialectic narrative' to denote the common ground between consciousness and class. The subject is contextualised into a subcapitalist paradigm of narrative that includes culture as a reality.

"Society is fundamentally responsible for capitalism," says Lacan; however, according to McElwaine[4] , it is not so much society that is fundamentally responsible for capitalism, but rather the genre, and subsequent failure, of society. Thus, if the capitalist paradigm of discourse holds, we have to choose between dialectic narrative and subsemiotic rationalism. The subject is interpolated into a subcapitalist paradigm of narrative that includes consciousness as a totality.

The characteristic theme of the works of Gaiman is a self-falsifying whole. However, the figure/ground distinction prevalent in Gaiman's Death: The Time of Your Life is also evident in Sandman, although in a more mythopoetical sense. Sontag's essay on the textual paradigm of expression states that the Constitution is capable of deconstruction.

It could be said that Foucault suggests the use of social realism to read sexual identity. Prinn[5] suggests that the works of Gaiman are postmodern.

Therefore, the main theme of Sargeant's[6] analysis of dialectic narrative is the stasis, and eventually the economy, of conceptualist reality. Several theories concerning the role of the observer as reader may be found. In a sense, Lacan promotes the use of the subcapitalist paradigm of narrative to challenge the status quo. Any number of dematerialisms concerning postcapitalist narrative exist.

Thus, social realism implies that class has significance, but only if narrativity is interchangeable with reality. In Jackie Brown, Tarantino examines dialectic narrative; in Reservoir Dogs, although, he affirms the subcapitalist paradigm of narrative.

But Lyotard uses the term 'social realism' to denote the fatal flaw of cultural society. Many discourses concerning the difference between class and consciousness may be discovered.


4. The Subcapitalist Paradigm of Narrative and Subcapitalist Socialism.

If one examines subcapitalist socialism, one is faced with a choice: either reject the semioticist paradigm of expression or conclude that culture is meaningless. However, the example of subcapitalist socialism which is a central theme of Tarantino's Jackie Brown emerges again in Four Rooms. Several narratives concerning the subcapitalist paradigm of narrative exist.

"Class is intrinsically a legal fiction," says Derrida. In a sense, the characteristic theme of the works of Tarantino is the futility, and eventually the absurdity, of neocultural society. The premise of subcapitalist socialism holds that the State is capable of intention, given that the subcapitalist paradigm of narrative is valid.

Therefore, many situationisms concerning the common ground between class and society may be found. If patriarchialist theory holds, we have to choose between social realism and postdialectic deconstruction.

However, the subject is contextualised into a subcapitalist socialism that includes sexuality as a reality. In Pulp Fiction, Tarantino analyses the subcapitalist paradigm of narrative; in Jackie Brown, however, he denies subcapitalist socialism.

In a sense, several discourses concerning the deconstructive paradigm of consensus exist. The subject is interpolated into a social realism that includes culture as a totality.
1. Cameron, L. C. (1990) Reading Sontag: The subcapitalist paradigm of narrative and social realism. University of Michigan Press

2. de Selby, M. ed. (1983) Social realism in the works of Gaiman. And/Or Press

3. Geoffrey, V. H. W. (1998) Reinventing Constructivism: Social realism and the subcapitalist paradigm of narrative. Schlangekraft

4. McElwaine, N. ed. (1983) The subcapitalist paradigm of narrative and social realism. Panic Button Books

5. Prinn, K. W. G. (1979) The Context of Paradigm: Social realism and the subcapitalist paradigm of narrative. Harvard University Press

6. Sargeant, F. C. ed. (1985) The subcapitalist paradigm of narrative in the works of Tarantino. Cambridge University Press

Tee...heee...just a joke,the essay you have just read is completely meaningless and was randomly generated by the Postmodernism Generator!!! The Postmodernism Generator was uses the Dada Engine, a system for generating random text from recursive grammars.

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